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Table of Contents:

Conservative Management of Knee Osteoarthritis
Knee Injuries & Pain
Newsletter, Winter 2014
Right Buttock Pain
Patellofemoral Pain (Runner's Knee, or knee pain)
Back to School Tips
Rotator Cuff Exercises
Rotator Cuff
Low Back Pain
Kerrisdale Physiotherapy now offers a Fall Prevention classes. Call to enquire: (604) 677-4665
Achilles Tendonitis


Conservative Management of Knee Osteoarthritis
(Download a PDF copy or print this article here)

Call to enquire: (604) 677-4665
Email: AskKerrisdalePhysio@gmail.com

 





 


Knee Injuries & Pain
Call to enquire: (604) 677-4665
Email: AskKerrisdalePhysio@gmail.com
1
2

Newsletter Winter 2014
Call to enquire: (604) 677-4665
Email: AskKerrisdalePhysio@gmail.com

W1

W2

W3

W5

W5

 

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Right Buttock Pain
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Email: AskKerrisdalePhysio@gmail.com

R1
R2
R3
R4

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Patellofemoral Pain (Runner's Knee)
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Email: AskKerrisdalePhysio@gmail.com

Knee Pain 1
Knee Pain 2
Knee Pain 3

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Back to School
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Email: AskKerrisdalePhysio@gmail.com










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Rotator Cuff Exercises
Call to enquire: (604) 677-4665
Email: AskKerrisdalePhysio@gmail.com
T1
T2
T3
T4
T5

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Rotator Cuff
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Email: AskKerrisdalePhysio@gmail.com
Rotator Cuff

T3

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Low Back Pain
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Low Back Pain1
Low Back Pain 2
Low Back Pain 3
Low Back Pain 4


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Kerrisdale Physiotherapy now offers a "Balance and Fall Prevention class".
Call to enquire: (604) 677-4665

Falls and Prevention Program
Balance and Fall Prevention


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Achilles Tendonitis
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ACHILLES TENDONITIS
 

What is it?

The Achilles tendon is that thick, cord-like band of connective tissue that is attached to your heel (calcaneus) from behind. It transmits power from the calf muscles to the heel and is used extensively in running and jumping sports. Under too much stress from these activities, the tendon becomes irritated and inflamed.

Achilles tendonitis is one of the more frequent overuse injuries in the lower limb. It is commonly seen in athletes and weekend warriors who run, participate in jumping related sports such as volleyball and basketball, dancers, and hikers. It needs to be differentiated from other problems that cause heel pain such as bursitis, impingement syndromes, and even pain referred from the lower back!

Achilles tendon

Symptoms

Typical tendonitis is felt 2-3cm above the heel attachment. It can begin as an irritation or tenderness felt in that tendon after a jog or hike. As it progresses, you'll feel it at the start of your event and as the tendon warms up it feels better and may even completely go away, but will become very sore again after the event. Eventually, the tendon may become warm and swollen all the time and can limit the ability to even walk normally. If this cycle repeats itself, eventually scar tissue can develop in the tendon. Occasionally there may be a sharp sudden pain and this is usually associated with a sudden traumatic partial tearing of the tendon.


Predisposing Factors

Poor Preparation In any running or jumping sport, beginning a season without sufficient preparation is a major risk factor. Keep the calf muscles stretched and have some basic cardiovascular fitness before training season begins.

Training errors Suddenly increasing mileage or hill work especially when combined with a failure to warm up correctly and stretch properly. For dancers, sudden increases in jumping or intensity of training can lead to this condition.

Footwear and surfaces For runners, ill fitting, incorrect or worn out shoes, running on cambered roads and poor running style are all important.

Flat Feet The over pronated foot is vulnerable as the heel is whipsawed from side to side during the walking or running cycle. This tends to be made worse by a turned out running style.

Age related Tendon blood supply reduces and connective tissues and shock absorbing fat pads tend to thin with age. This puts the over 40 athlete at a little more risk.

Direct Trauma A previous kick, blow or laceration can weaken the tendon.

Poor Core Stability Weakness around the pelvis and trunk muscles can produce a turned out gait which tends to increase pronation leading to tendon strain.

Treatment

The key to developing a successful treatment plan begins with a thorough examination and a proper diagnosis. As mentioned earlier, although posterior heel pain in athletes and weekend warriors can be due Achilles Tendinitis, it can also be caused by a number of other conditions unrelated to the tendon. As such, you should consult your Physiotherapist first to get the diagnosis right and get appropriate treatment.

Treatment for an acutely inflamed tendon consists of icing (ice cube directly on the tendon works best), modification or even cessation of sport and aggravating activities, initially gentle low load high repetitious exercises that target the tendon and muscle in the short and mid range progressing to the lengthened range, manual techniques to release scar tissue, and finally progression of the exercise protocol to include strengthening of the tendon and finally power the tendon.

In Chronic Achilles Tendinitis (more accurately "Tendinosis"), research has shown that eccentric high load and low repetitious exercises along with strengthening of the tendon is very effecting and can at most times be implemented right away. When engaging in such heavy resistance, however, one always runs the risk of rupturing the tendon completely. Care then must be taken in dosing the resistance properly and having appropriate rest between exercise days so the tendon can recover and strengthen before loading it again. Ice has been shown to be of little benefit since chronic degenerative conditions are from wear and tear and little to no inflammation actually occurs.

 

 

We hope you found this article helpful.

Remember to always consult your Physiotherapist before
engaging in therapeutic exercise or if you're not sure if this
exercise is right for you.

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The achilles tendon is capable of taking and producing a lot of power. The highest jumpers and fastest sprinters rely heavily on this tendon to be long and elastic to store potential energy and release it at the exact right moment like a strong rubber band to give the athlete the snap that they need for that extra bit of speed and power!

 

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